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2017 4 December 2017


ET News Digest
Your Weekly Education Newsletter
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Amgen biotech experience

There’s nothing like getting your hands dirty when you’re learning something new or, in the case of the Amgen Biotech Experience (ABE), your micropipette. The program which has run for close to 30 years in the US and the UK launched in Australia in September after pilot programs were well attended and received. And that’s for good reason; the program gives teachers and students access to (expensive) industry standard equipment and exposure to the work that biomedical researchers and technicians perform every day. Read More

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Congratulations Renee McCarthy 2017 ARIA Music Teacher of the Year

Renee McCarthy (Ms Mac if you’re her student) from Woodcroft College in Morphett Vale South Australia received the inaugural ARIA Music Teacher of the Year Award, presented with The Song Room and sponsored by Telstra.
     Her music program at has helped students get involved in positive activities, establish connections with others and develop their confidence. Read More

Mentoring girls into maths

The Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute (AMSI) and the BHP Billiton Foundation’s Choose Maths Gender Report makes for some concerning reading; only 7 per cent of girls participated in Year 12 advanced maths in 2016 compared with 12 per cent of boys. The report’s authors believe access to industry and academic maths mentors in Years 9 and 10 is critical to support girls to consider maths as they make key subject selections and explore career pathways. Read More

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Schrole Verify background checks international job applicants

So they looked right, the CV was excellent and the references immaculate, but there was something, just a suspicion, that all was not well with the new international job applicant.

There’s two alternatives, put them on and see what happens or dig a little further using a tool like Schrole Verify, a new product that enables international schools and teachers to easily conduct employee background checks. Read More

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Schools still gatekeeping disabled students

While a lot of schools are doing a great job with disabled students some, probably too many, are still actively blocking them from attending, effectively putting them in the too hard basket.

     Over 70% of families in mainstream education to have been subject to gatekeeping and restrictive practices according to the report Gatekeeping and restrictive practices with students with disability Read More

There’s more than one path to a satisfying career

Too many students are dropping out of uni, too many regret the electives they’ve chosen and too many arrive at and finish university unsure of what career path to take.
     The problem seems to start in High school; it’s expected, or encouraged at least, that most will go on to attend university, this might need a major rethink. Most schools currently spend less than the value of a cup of coffee per student per year on careers advice. Read More

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NDIS exclusion of education a missed opportunity

The opportunity to develop a progressive disability policy-funding system providing seamless access to appropriate services and support has not been realised with the roll-out of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), show researchers from Deakin University. Read More

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Gaming education

If there was one thing that came out of the recently released Digital Australia Report which looked into the effects of gaming in Australia it’s that video games have infused every part of the society; video games are everywhere and used by people of all ages and walks of life, of the sample 86% said they gamed.
     Gaming is pervasive but is it positive? Well yes. Games bring people together, stimulate the mind and give opportunity for learning. Gaming is also good for social connection and mental well being. Read More

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Recognising the value of industry-driven skills  

There’s nothing wrong with a job where you come home with your hands dirty and sweat upon your brow, plenty will tell you of the fun to be had in physical work and indeed many trades can be very financially rewarding.

 

Chair of the Australian Industry and Skills Committee (AISC), John Pollaers, has called for greater recognition of the value of industry-driven skills in meeting the needs of both businesses and workers. Read More

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